Friday, June 29, 2007

New technologies

Sharing slide presentations. http://www.slideshare.net could provide a way to share PowerPoint presentations with a larger group. http://www.slideshare.net/dpeter19

Also, to share and keep Internet bookmarks http://del.icio.us/. The ability to add tags and subscribe to other collections of bookmarks. http://del.icio.us/dpeter19

Online brainstorming. http://www.bubbl.us/. Creates a Flash format file that can be embedded into a web page or other compatible media.

Tuesday, June 19, 2007

Teaching styles, learning styles, active learning and digital assets

Reflecting on the relationship between teaching styles and learning styles, and how this can be impacted/directed by active learning, I wonder how the use of digital assets can fit into this comparison? It may be relatively safe to assume that certain learning styles would find the use of digital assets to be more engaging. It may be safe to assume that certain teaching styles would favor using digital assets in teaching.

Does the use or integration or even introduction of digital assets change or transform a person's teaching style? Is it likely to presume that technologically savvy teachers would gravitate towards the digital assets? Can their past experience with technology predict their likelihood to use digital assets?

Thursday, June 14, 2007

Reading List

Created June 14, 2007; Updated last September 14, 2009

Transformation

  • Berkun, S. (2007). The myths of innovation. Sebastopol, CA: O'Reilly.
  • Chickering, A., & Gamson, Z. (1987). "Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education." American Association for Higher Education Bulletin 39(7), 3-7.
  • Ferraro, J. (2000). Reflective practice and professional development. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.: ED449120).
  • Freed, J. (2005). "Creating a total quality environment (TQE) for learning." Journal of Management Education 29(1), 60-81.
  • McClenney, K. (2004). "Redefining quality in community colleges." Change 36(6), 16-21.
  • Travis, J. (1996). Models for improving college teaching: A faculty resource. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.: ED403810).
Teaching Styles
  • Brown, B. (2003). Teaching style vs. learning style: Myths and realities. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.: ED482329).
  • Davis, B. (1993). Tools for teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Learning Styles
  • Brualdi, A. (1996). Multiple intelligences: Gardner's theory. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.: ED 410226).
  • Davis, B. (1993). Tools for teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
  • Gardner, H. (1985). Frames of mind: The theory of multiple intelligences. New York, NY: Basic Books.
  • Gardner, H. (1993). Multiple intelligences: The theory in practice. New York: NY: BasicBooks.
  • Gardner, H. (2006). Five minds for the future. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.
Concept Mapping
  • Novak, J. (1998). Learning, creating, and using knowledge: Concept Maps TM as facilitative tools in schools and corporations. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  • Plotnick, E. (1997). Concept mapping: A graphical system for understanding the relationship between concepts. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.:ED407938)
Active Learning
  • Bonwell, C., & Eison, J. (1991). Active learning: Creating excitement in the classroom. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.: ED340272).
  • Bonwell, C., & Eison, J. (1991). Active learning: Creating excitement in the classroom. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 1. Washington, DC: The George Washington University, School of Education and Human Development.
  • Meyers, C., & Jones, T. (1993). Promoting active learning: Strategies for the college classroom. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
  • Silberman, M. (1995). 101 ways to make training active. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer.
  • Stalheim-Smith, A. (1998). Focusing on active, meaningful learning. IDEA Paper No. 34. Manhattan, KS: Kansas State University, IDEA Center. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.ED418659)
Classroom Management
  • Davis, B. (1993). Tools for teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
  • Metzker, B. (2003). Time and learning. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.: ED474260).
  • National Education Association Research Department. (2006). Classroom management: Brief. Washington, DC: National Education Association. (ERIC Document Reproduction Services No.: ED495812).
Teaching Methods, Teaching Strategies
  • Brown, B. (2001). Group effectiveness in the classroom and workplace: Practical application brief no. 15. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.: ED451346)
  • Davis, B. (1993). Tools for teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Assessment and Evaluation
  • Angelo, T., & Cross, K. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for college teachers. (2nd Ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
  • Kirkpatrick, D., & Kirkpatrick, J. (2006). Evaluating training programs: The four levels. (3rd Ed.). San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler Publishers.
  • Suskie, L. (2004). Assessing student learning: A common sense guide. Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing.
  • Suskie, L. (2009). Assessing student learning: A common sense guide. (2nd Ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Technology
  • Bates, A., & Poole, G. (2003). Effective teaching with technology in higher education: Foundations for success. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
  • Bonk, C. (2009). The world is open: How web technology is revolutionizing education. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Tuesday, June 12, 2007

Active Learning

Reflecting on active learning ... and seeking answers to a question like "How do you evaluate active learning?" I read (again) Bonwell and Eison (1991) and Meyers and Jones (1993). Active learning is an effective method or strategy. I believe that it can work, but it requires some advanced planning on the part of the instructor.

An interesting perspective is from Mitchell (2006), is that "There IS evidence that active learning, student-centered approaches to teaching physiology work, and they work better than more passive approaches" (p. 165). This may be the beginning point, or tipping point (see Gladwell, 2002), for improving or transforming teaching AND learning. Intuitively we can see that active learning ENGAGES students in the process of learning.

More on this topic as it develops ...


Bonwell, C., & Eison, J. (1991). Active learning: Creating excitement in the classroom. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.: ED340272).

Gladwell, M. (2002). The tipping point: How little things can make a big difference. New York, NY: Back Bay Books.

Meyers, C., & Jones, T. (1993). Promoting active learning: Strategies for the college classroom. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Mitchell, J. (2006). "Where's the evidence that active learning works?" Advances in Physiology Education 30, 159-167.

Tuesday, June 05, 2007

New Faculty Orientation Topics

First Things First

  • What Is a Good Teacher?
  • Preparing to Teach: Planning a Course
  • Recognizing Your Instructional Style
  • Teaching Methods
  • Civility: The Affective Concerns of Teaching
  • The First Day of Class
  • First Class Survival Tips

Classroom Management

  • Managing the Classroom
  • Planning a Class Session
  • Practical Tips for Planning & Teaching a Lesson
  • How to Manage Classroom Discussions
  • The Basics of Learning Assessment
  • Strategies for Common Difficulties in Planning Courses
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