Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Technology for Teaching and Learning - Wiki

OK, so I'm seeing how a wiki can be used for promoting effective teaching, quality instruction and professional development. This wiki is a Google Site that will focus on new(er) media in teaching and learning. Google Sites (url http://www.google.com/sites/overview.html) is a wiki space.

Technology for Teaching and Learning

(The URL just incase is http://sites.google.com/site/techteachlearn/)

Monday, October 27, 2008

Reflections from the League for Innovation, CIT 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah

Technology has many more potential uses for improving student success, integrating classes together, enhancing academic challenge and developing lifelong learning skills. Too often technology is merely viewed as an instructional aid than a pedagogical alternative. It is easier to view technology as a device to help the instructor present curricular materials or to limit the use of technology to a specific time and place, such as a classroom, than to begin to view the unlimited uses of technology.

Technology has potential uses for enhancing collaboration, developing learning or social networks, promoting connections or networks to the boundless array of instructional resources. It is the newer uses of technology that provide then greatest potential to ensure future as well as present success for students.

Collaborative technologies do not merely provide venues for students to work together, they provide instructors the opportunities to teach from a project-based or problem-based perspective. Curricular work that would normally be completed in a classroom can now be extended beyond the walls of the classroom.
  • Collaborative technologies, such as Google Groups, Google Documents, Google Notebooks and Google Sites, allow students to develop and explore team dynamics.
  • The technologies allow students to learn both in and outside of the traditional class and begin to emulate work teams found in business and industry.
  • Creating a history of contributions, the technologies provide evidence for both instructor and student of the development of the project, individual contributions, and the group process.
  • As students collaborate, their perspective on both their abilities and the abilities of others should increase. They will begin to develop critical thinking skills, evaluating digital information for example.

Networking technologies are not only the “physical” network connections, wireless and wired, but are also the resources available for learning. To build a network, in the physical sense, involves wiring connections, and access points. In the virtual sense, networking technologies allow students to connect to resources on an as needed basis, identify and locate others with shared or similar interests. Networking is seen from the business and industry as a necessary element for success. Students likewise must begin to network to resources for learning success, both in and outside of the classroom.
  • Networking technologies, such as Google Reader, Google Books, Google Scholar and Google Groups, allow students to make the connections to others for support, assistance, and exposure or access to resources.
  • Networking technologies allow students to develop a sense of the structure of knowledge, and a sense of a community of experts as their personal networks become more and more extended.
  • As students continue to network, the opportunities for collaboration will increase.

Social technologies may provide the greatest opportunity for students to connect with other students, friends, acquaintances, faculty and others. These technologies may at first be dismissed as having little value or impact on student learning. However, these technologies provide the greatest opportunity to explore, develop and maintain many of the ad hoc communities so essential for student engagement.
  • Social technologies, such as Google Groups and Google Chat, allow students to develop social groups, or communities centered around a variety of interests. It is the development of these social groups that promote continued engagement for students.
  • Social technologies will allow students to belong to a community, a virtual neighborhood, and provide them with a venue for interaction.
  • As students grow in their social communities, the opportunities for networking increase as well as the opportunities for collaboration.

The specific uses of technology, whether social, collaborative, or network, should not be viewed as discrete uses. The technologies may blur depending on instructor use, student use or instructor and student use. It is not the technology alone that impacts learning, but the use and application of technology.

The uses of technology should focus, whether directly or indirectly, on improving or enhancing the quality of the instructional experience. We do not use technology ‘just because’ it is available, we should use technology to improve the quality of instruction, to enhance student success, to foster greater academic challenge and to prepare students for the workforce. Technology is fast becoming an expectation of students, whether in the classroom or the institution.

Thursday, October 23, 2008

Collaborative Technologies

To increase student collaboration, it is important to describe the four main focuses of collaboration. First, collaboration will focus on the group or team. Second, collaboration allows individuals to develop and explore skills and knowledge. Third, time on task is heightened in collaboration. Finally, high expectations are an integral part of collaboration.

Collaborations allow students to benefit from their contributions. Not only are the collaborators able to grow individually, but they also grow from the contributions of others. This is a social event, where the contributions add to the greater social knowledge.

It is important to remember that collaboration, when used as a teaching strategy, will give the participants opportunities to craft and define group roles, group expectations, and negotiate group conflict resolution processes. Group members will have the opportunity to develop project rubrics.

Some examples of software that promotes collaboration include Google Documents, Google Groups, Google Sites and Google Notebooks.



Learning Technologies and Web 2.0

Sunday, October 19, 2008

Thoughts on technology, teaching and learning

It is important to remember that the newer technologies are and should be used to improve teaching and learning, not to replace the teacher or teachers. It is important to remember that technology is only a tool. We are expected to use technology. Students want and demand that we use technology. Their expectations are the ones that guide us, or should guide us. Often we are expected to adapt to the technology, rather than adopt technology that will help us teach better, or learn more efficiently.

It is even more important to think of why we use technology in the classroom. First, I believe that we should use technology not only in the physical context of the classroom, but also in the extended classroom. To only use technology in the classroom may limit and exclude the potential for learning, and we want students to learn for their lifetime.

If students are more apt to try things out and explore new and emerging technologies, is it equally probably that faculty will try and explore things … if they have the support to try and fail.

These new technologies are becoming more and more commonplace … for the students. It’s easier to imagine that students know HOW to use the technology. But, how do students USE the technologies? Do we need to RETEACH them how to use the technology to learn? It’s often easier to assume and presume that the students need to learn OUR way than for us to learn other ways to use technology. So, what are we to do?

Tuesday, October 14, 2008

Role of Technology in Teaching and Learning

Role Of Technology In Teaching And Learning
(NOTE: You may want to click the FULL SCREEN link for optimal viewing)

View SlideShare presentation or Upload your own. (tags: web2 technology)

CIT S-152 Frontline Faculty Development Technology Tools: Reading List

CIT S-152 Frontline Faculty Development Technology Tools

Presentation Type: Forum Session

Session Stream: Emerging and Future Educational Technology - Each year, Track One focuses on emerging technology believed to be of particular interest to educators. For the 2008 CIT, the special focus of Track One is Web 2.0 and Its Implication for Community Colleges. The constellation of web applications referred to as Web 2.0 (e.g. semantic web, collaborative document sharing, social bookmarking, blogs, podcasts, RSS, aggregators, wikis, social tagging, personal portals, and virtual communities) influences the way many of our students live and work. However, the use of these technologies also creates new challenges and raises many questions about their impact on student learning and institutional management. Do these tools provide more meaningful experiences and better educational outcomes than traditional methods? Have faculty and staff found these technologies useful for collaborating with colleagues? Does Web 2.0 create new security vulnerabilities or require new safeguards? Proposals targeted toward these or other questions related to Web 2.0 are strongly encouraged. Although Web 2.0 and Its Implication for Community Colleges is the special focus of the 2008 CIT, other proposal topics are also strongly encouraged.

Presentation Title: Frontline Faculty Development Technology Tools

Presentation Description: What impact do Web 2.0 technologies have on faculty development? From the perspective of the Center for Teaching and Learning, the uses of blogs, wikis, podcasts and social bookmarking has the potential to radically transform the landscape of professional development. Harnessing these technologies may be one challenge. Those involved in teaching and learning and faculty development will leave with real-world examples of these technologies and see their uses in teaching, learning and faculty development.

Presentation Plan: This interactive presentation and discussion will encourage audience participation. Through a demonstration, participants will be introduced to the technologies. With presentation handouts, best practices will be presented and demonstrated.

REFERENCES:

Addison, C. (2006). Web 2.0: A new chapter in development in practice? Development in Practice 16(6), 623-627.

Alexander, B. (2006). Web 2.0: A new wave of innovation for teaching and learning? EDUCAUSE Review 41(2), 32-44.

Bates, A., & Poole, G. (2003). Effective teaching with technology in higher education: Foundations for success. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Brown, D. (1999). Always in touch: A practical guide to ubiquitous computing. Winston-Salem, NC: Wake Forest University Press.

Brown, D., McCray, G., Runde, C., & Schweizer, H. (2002). Using technology in learner-centered instruction: Proven strategies for teaching and learning. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

Brown, D. (2003). Philosophy: Faculty as eager adopters. In D. Brown, (Ed.), Developing faculty to use technology: Programs and strategies to enhance teaching, 2-3. Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing, Company.

Chism, N. (2004). Using a framework to engage faculty in instructional technologies. EDUCAUSE Quarterly 27(2), 38-45.

Epper, R. (2001). The new economy meets the ivory tower. In R. Epper and A. Bates, (Eds.), Teaching faculty how to use technology: Best practices from leading institutions, pp. 1-18. Westport, CT: American Council on Education, Oryx Press.

Fullan, M. (1995). The limits and the potential of professional development. In T. Guskey and M. Huberman (Eds.), Professional development in education: New paradigms and practices, pp. 253-267. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

Gentry, C. (1995). Educational technology: A question of meaning. In G. Anglin (Ed.), Instructional technology: Past, present, and future (2nd Ed.), pp. 1-10. Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited.

Gerniger, J. (2003). Reflections on professional development: Toward high-quality teaching and learning. Phi Delta Kappan 84(5), 373-375.

Guskey, T. (1991). Enhancing the effectiveness of professional development programs. Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation 2(3), 239-247.

Guskey, T. (1995). Professional development in education: In search of the optimal mix. In T. Guskey and M. Huberman (Eds.), Professional development in education: New paradigms and practices, pp. 114-131. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

Hoadley, M., Engelking, J., & Bright, L. (1995). A model for technology infusion in higher education. In D. Willis (Ed.), Technology and Teacher Education Annual, 1995: Proceedings of the International Conference of the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education, pp. 410-413. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.: ED381148).

Laughner, T. (2003). Program philosophy: Keeping sight of what’s important. In D. Brown, (Ed.), Developing faculty to use technology: Programs and strategies to enhance teaching, 6-8. Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing, Company.

Li, C., & Bernoff, J. (2008). Groundswell: Winning in a world transformed by social technologies. Boston, MA: Harvard Business Press.

Nantz, K., & Lundgren, T. (1998). Lecturing with technology. College Teaching 46(2), 53-56.

Negroponte, N. (1995). Being digital. New York, NY: Alfred A. Knopf.

New Media Consortium. (2007). The horizon report: 2007 edition. Austin, TX: The New Media Consortium. Retrieved July 17, 2008 from http://www.nmc.org/pdf/2007_Horizon_Report.pdf.

New Media Consortium. (2008). The horizon report: 2008 edition. Austin, TX: The New Media Consortium. Retrieved July 17, 2008 from http://www.nmc.org/pdf/2008-Horizon-Report.pdf.

Oblinger, D. (1996). Creating a learning culture. In L. Johnson & S. Lobello (Eds.), The 21st century community college: Technology and the new learning paradigm (pp. 27-38). White Plains, NY: International Business Machines Corporation.

Oblinger, D. (2003). Boomers, gen-exers and millennials: Understanding the new students. EDUCAUSE Review 38(4), 36-47.

Schlosser, L., & Simonson, M. (2006). Distance education: Definition and glossary of terms. (2nd Ed.). Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing.

Spence, C. (1996). Leading the technology agenda on campus. In L. Johnson & S. Lobello (Eds.), The 21st century community college: Technology and the new learning paradigm (pp. 19-26). White Plains, NY: International Business Machines Corporation.

Veen, W., & Vrakking, B. (2006). Homo zappiens: Growing up in a digital age. London, UK: Network Continium Education.

Wiske, M., Franz, K., & Breit, L. (2005). Teaching for understanding with technology. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

CIT S-141 Technology, Teaching and Learning: From the Frontline: Reading List

CIT S-141 Technology, Teaching and Learning: From the Frontline

Presentation Type: Forum Session

Session Stream: Teaching and Learning - This track focuses on innovative technology applications for teaching and learning.

Presentation Title: Technology, Teaching and Learning: From the Frontline

Presentation Description: How does technology change the way we teach? The way students learn? Can technology really make a difference? These questions will be used to start our exploration of the research and best practices. If you are involved in teaching and learning, and are curious about integrating technology effectively, this session will equip you with sound strategies you can implement now.

Presentation Plan: This interactive discussion will encourage audience participation. Using a combination of a PowerPoint presentation, handouts, and multimedia participants will see the uses of technology demonstrated and be encouraged to ask questions focused on the classroom uses of technology.

REFERENCES:

Barr, R., & Tagg, J. (1995). From teaching to learning: A new paradigm for undergraduate education. Change 27(6), 12-25.

Bates, A., & Poole, G. (2003). Effective teaching with technology in higher education: Foundations for success. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Bonwell, C., & Eison, J. (1991). Active learning: Creating excitement in the classroom. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 1. Washington, DC: The George Washington University, School of Education and Human Development.

Brown, D. (1999). Always in touch: A practical guide to ubiquitous computing. Winston-Salem, NC: Wake Forest University Press.

Brown, D. (2003). The ubiquitous computing movement. In D. Brown, (Ed.), Ubiquitous computing: The universal use of computers on college campuses, pp. 1-13 , Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing Company.

Brown, D. (2005, Spring). Concluding comments: Laptop learning communities. In M. D. Svinicki & R. E. Rice (Series Eds.), & L. Nilson & B. Weaver (Vol. Eds.), New directions for teaching and learning: Number 101. Enhancing learning with laptops in the classroom (pp. 89-94). San Francisco, CA:Jossey-Bass.

Clark, R. (1983). Reconsidering research on learning from media. Review of Educational Research 53(4), 445-459.

Chickering, A., & Gamson, Z. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. American Association for Higher Education Bulletin 39(7), 3-7.

Friedman, T. (2006). The world is flat: A brief history of the twenty-first century. New York, NY: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux.

Gentry, C. (1995). Educational technology: A question of meaning. In G. Anglin (Ed.), Instructional technology: Past, present, and future (2nd Ed.), pp. 1-10. Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited.

Gladwell, M. (2002). The tipping point: How little things can make a big difference. New York, NY: Little, Brown and Company, Back Bay Books.

Gladwell, M. (2005). Blink: The power of thinking without thinking. New York, NY: Little Brown and Company, Back Bay Books.

Grasha, A., & Yangarber-Hicks, N. (2000). Integrating teaching styles and learning styles with instructional technology. College Teaching 48(1), 2-10.

Green, K. (1999). When wishes come true. Change, 31(2),10-15.

Hoadley, M., Engelking, J., & Bright, L. (1995). A model for technology infusion in higher education. In D. Willis (Ed.), Technology and Teacher Education Annual, 1995: Proceedings of the International Conference of the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education, pp. 410-413. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.: ED381148).

Kozma, R. (1991). Learning with media. Review of Educational Research 61(2), 179-211.

Li, C., & Bernoff, J. (2008). Groundswell: Winning in a world transformed by social technologies. Boston, MA: Harvard Business Press.

Meyers, C., & Jones, T. (1993). Promoting active learning: Strategies for the college classroom. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Moore, M. (1989). Editorial: Three types of interaction. The American Journal of Distance Education, 3(2), 1-6.

Nantz, K., & Lundgren, T. (1998). Lecturing with technology. College Teaching 46(2), 53-56.

Negroponte, N. (1995). Being digital. New York, NY: Alfred A. Knopf.

New Media Consortium. (2004). The horizon report: 2004 edition. Austin, TX: The New Media Consortium. Retrieved July 17, 2008 from http://www.nmc.org/pdf/2004_Horizon_Report.pdf.

New Media Consortium. (2006). The horizon report: 2006 edition. Austin, TX: The New Media Consortium. Retrieved July 17, 2008 from http://www.nmc.org/pdf/2006_Horizon_Report.pdf.

New Media Consortium. (2008). The horizon report: 2008 edition. Austin, TX: The New Media Consortium. Retrieved July 17, 2008 from http://www.nmc.org/pdf/2008-Horizon-Report.pdf.

O’Banion, T. (December/January 1995-1996). A learning college for the 21st century. Community College Journal 66(3), 18-23.

O'Banion, T. (1997). Creating more learning-centered community colleges. Mission Viejo, CA: League for Innovation in the Community College.

Oblinger, D. (2003). Boomers, gen-exers and millennials: Understanding the new students. EDUCAUSE Review 38(4), 36-47.

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital natives, digital immigrants. On the Horizon 9(5), 1-6. Available online at http://www.marcprensky.com/writing/Prensky%20-%20Digital%20Natives,%20Digital%20Immigrants%20-%20Part1.pdf

Richardson, W. (2006). Blogs, wikis, podcasts, and other powerful web tools for classrooms. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Veen, W., & Vrakking, B. (2006). Homo zappiens: Growing up in a digital age. London, UK: Network Continium Education.
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